• WANTED

    Videogame translators

    (French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian & Spanish)

  • LocJAM2

    22 February–1 March 2015
    Worldwide

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  • Global & local

    Online or in a workshop near you

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About

Let's translate worlds!

- 2015, Worldwide

A non-profit videogame translation contest organized by team GLOC, the Localization SIG of the IGDA and the IGDA Japan Chapter.

LocJAM is an official IGDA program supported by the IGDA Foundation.

The Vision

A free and open source game translatable in less than one day. Eight days for honing your text to perfection. And the best of the industry, ready to take notice.

Worldwide

Rules to follow, file to translate, form for applying: this website and a computer with internet access are all you need to participate.

Workshops

First time translating a game? No problem! Join one of the optional local workshops, organized by veteran localizers.

Contest outline

Application

Competition begins Sunday February 22nd 2015 at 00:01 and ends Sunday March 1st at 23:59 (Greenwich Mean Time). The text to be translated and a submission form will be published on this website. No previous registration is required.

Only English to French, German, Italian, Japanese, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian, European Spanish and Latin American Spanish are eligible. Both professional and amateur translators are eligible and there is no fee for entry.

Screening and review

Entries are reviewed in anonymous form.

The basic translation level of each entry will be checked by professional translators.

Entries that pass the initial screening will be judged by the jurors, which will pick their favorite professional and amateur translations in their language.

Announcement of Winners

Winners will be announced in May 2015 and will be invited for a studio tour by their juror*. Non winning entries and names will be deleted.

* Synthesis Brazil and Wordlab will issue a diploma instead

Local workshops

Contest results

Contest results

Congratulations!

Here are the winning entries for this second LocJAM. Come to discuss them on our official Facebook group or on the event chat

 

FRENCH

Game Audio Factory

Pro: Eva Seris (play)
Good style, no errors. I liked the terminology choices, they were consistent throughout the text and logical, and well adapted to a French audience.
I also liked the use of the past tense

Amateur: Antoine Halté (play)
Good style, no errors. I liked the terminology choices, they were consistent throughout the text and logical, and well adapted to a French audience.
I also liked the use of the past tense

Mentions:
Steve (play), Anthony Teixeira (play)


Gorgone Productions

Pro: Ophélie Vielles (play)
– No spelling mistakes or errors which is always good!
– Punctuation in the choices is consistent.
– The adaption effort is great, it really matches the characters and the tone of the narrative without giving the impressoin it’s translated.

Amateur: Cédric J. Samson (play)
– No spelling mistakes or errors.
– Correct use of the French punctuation.
– The style is great, and compared to the other amateur entries this one really stands out, being for quality, adaptation and style.


La Marque Rose

Pro: Lucie Prunier (play)
What is there to say? Apart from a minor issue, your translation is close to perfection, both in terms of style and typography. You accomplished a thorough work while grasping the essence of the cute creepiness of this game.
Your sentences are both simplistic and fluid, establishing a child-like atmosphere and preventing the narration from getting too emphatic or complicated. Getting it all to present tense was a great choice, as it allows the player to feel closer and more and more implicated as the game progresses. The item names, which are a key feature of this game, have been translated in a funny and creative manner as well.

Amateur: Anne-Sophie De Clercq (play)
Congratulations! You have tackled this translation with lots of enthusiasm, and it served you quite well. Right off the bat, you made bold translation choices in order to adapt the game to your own style of writing rather than the other way around. The tense has been changed from past to present, which allows you to implicate the player further in the game’s progression. You managed to get around the source’s difficulties by rearranging the sentences, which results in a simple and fluid message. You also chose to use the first person plural when translating actions, recreating the “impersonal” aspect they had in the source.

However, your enthusiasm is also your translation’s greatest weakness. While this game is an interactive story, you must keep in mind that this is still a game. Therefore, basic instructions such as “Back” and “Next” are acceptable and should be kept simple. By trying to blend them in the story, you end up giving them a meaning that doesn’t quite fit the actions they are used for. Also, as a translator, you are allowed to rearrange the text and even shorten or remove certain sentences from a paragraph if you feel it will make the text clearer, but it is not your place to decide whether or not a section of the text should be displayed, even if it is indeed superfluous.

Nevertheless, these issues do not impair the atmosphere or quality of the target game, and the quality of your translation and thoroughness of your work are undeniable advantages that largely outweigh these drawbacks.

 

GERMAN

Altagram GmbH

Pro: Thomas Prager (play)
This translation is a nice and fluent read, proofing a good sense and rhythm of the language. The style is smooth and natural, which shows that it is not a simple and literal translation, but a creative localization. The translator found some nice solutions for tricky sentences.
Furthermore, we picked this entry, because it was one of the very few entries that had (almost) no issues with grammar, punctuation or spelling. Very nice job!

Amateur: Tobias Koelzer (play)
We really like this creative and colorful translation. It was very well adapted to the tone of the game and we appreciate the translator’s extra effort to implement some rhymes [Besser eine Brechstange in der Hand, als ungenutzt an der Wand!].
There are a few issues in punctuation and grammar, but with a bit of polishing and a professional proofreading the translation could easily go for a pro entry.


Anakan GmbH

Pro: Thomas Rühl (play)
This entry stands out from the other professional translations for its high level of accuracy and very natural, tongue-in-cheek style that nevertheless never feels obtrusive or overdone, resulting in great readability. The translator has managed to find creative solutions to artfully maneuver potentially difficult sections of the source text and is one of the very few contestants whose entry is completely free of errors. Congratulations on a job well done!

Amateur: Mia Schütz (play)
The translator did a good job at capturing the mood and style of the original game while exhibiting a good eye for potential “pitfalls,” with great care for accuracy. On a technical level, the translation fared better than even most professional entries. Overall, this translation is an admirable work!


GlobaLoc GmbH

Pro: Kevin Stober (play)
A very creative translation combined with a great linguistic style. Thanks to the clear sentence structure and precise use of words, the story of Emi and her grandpa was very captivating and fun to follow. All in all, there were very few mistakes and the ending was quite moving. Congratulations!

Amateur: Mia Schütz (play)
This very creative and consistent translation was a lot of fun to read. The way Emi communicated with her grandpa was very natural and realistic and the item names stood out from many other candidates.
The translator has a great understanding of words and concepts misinterpreted by a number of “amateurs”. Keep up the good work!


Native Prime

Pro: Lisa Braun (play)
The translation is really a pleasure to read. The formulations are appealing and fitting the context of the game. The translator found good solutions for the inventory and other challenges. The language is very figurative and catchy.

Amateur: Nicolaas Bongaerts (play)
The translation is good and idiomatic, and fitting the context of the game. The translator has proven creativity and thoughtfulness, and found good solutions for the different challenges. The translation is really enjoyable!


Partnertrans GmbH

Pro: Johanna Bethke (play)
The translator has a very good style and translated freely. The translation sounded not only natural, but rather as if I was reading a good book. Good job!

Amateur: Franziska Eggert (play)
Even though there were a couple of technical issues, the game has been translated freely and it sounded very natural. The technical issues can be corrected, but to be able to translate freely is a gift, that seems to come naturally for this translator.


Synthesis Deutschland GmbH

Pro: Tabea Keller (play)
The winner succeeds in recreating the atmosphere of the game by localizing it with a natural as well as beautiful language and paying attention to even the smallest details.

Amateur: Gerald Hintermaier (play)

Mentions:
Tanja Braun (play), Kevin Stober (play)

 

ITALIAN

Binari Sonori

Pro: Lisa Franchini (play)
Reading this translation has been a real pleasure!
Emy’s words are beautifully rendered in Italian, you can almost feel the intense relationship she has with her grandpa. The overall style is very gentle and amusing, and I especially appreciated the use of the present tense, which really gets you into the story.
Well done!

Amateur: Elisa Zilocchi (play)
A very good job, especially if we consider that the candidate is an amateur translator.
The text reads fluidly with a pleasant rhythm, and in most cases the English content was carefully shaped to fit the Italian syntax.
Hopefully, this is the first step of a successful career in video games translation 😉


Jinglebell Communication

Pro: Marta Fumagalli (play)
Apart from the formal correctness, that has been taken for granted, what has made us favor this translation over a few others that presented a comparable level of quality, is the ability of reaching a good fluency of expression while keeping it all short and simple. It is not 100% flawless (E.g.: the position of the “h” in interjections doubled or tripled for laughter should be inverted in Italian – “Ah ah!” instead of “Ha ha!”) and there’s always margin for improvement (when checking more translations at the same time it’s easy to find out that someone came up with a better solution than yours), but the overall result made us go for it in the end. Congratulations!

Amateur: Clara Pomes (play)
This translation, as well as few other ones, made us doubt at first about having to do with a non-professional translator. At a more careful examination some naïve traits of the work dispelled our doubt, but the overall quality is so good that he/she stuck out from the rest of the amateurs with relative ease. What made us prefer it amid a small number of competitors is the extra accuracy in respecting the game coding and caring about the appearance of texts in the game itself. Congratulations!

Mentions:
Gaia Talamini e Valentina Paggiarin (play), Jacopo Oldani (play), Marco Calcaterra (play), Mikhail Sabbatelli (play)


Studio Arkì

Pro: Marco Calcaterra (play)
This translation is beautifully written, very readable, maintains an appropriate style, and exhibits creativity and consistency. Linguistic prowess, good vocabulary, very good adaptation.

Amateur: Matteo Zino (play)
Linguistic prowess, good vocabulary, very good adaptation of the dialogues, brilliant and funny style overall. No mistakes. This is a Pro-level localization.

Mentions:
Maura Dalai (play), Luca Poli (play)


Synthesis

Pro: Lisa Franchini (play)
Smooth, un-pretentious, spot-on translation, good match on source mood. A few minor style tweakings might be needed, but overall sentence structure made it an easy/enjoyable read with no sacrifice in meaning.

Amateur: Francesco Donatiello (play)
Good attempt to deliver a non-literal, creative job. Good internal consistency. Fine word choices. Shows a good command of Italian grammar/orthography.

Mentions: Marta Fumagalli (play), Desirè Da Ros (play)

 

JAPANESE

Keywords International

Pro: Mamiko Ito (play)
Very few mistranslations. The Japanese is very smooth and natural, and the way Emi speaks is both catchy & attractive. The original character is a little creepier and crazier than maybe the translation lets on, but the direction the translator took of making her style of speech a bit more innocent made the translation fun to read and the character more lovable to the player.

Amateur: Takumi Ogawara (play)
Some mistranslations, but the Japanese feels alive and is easy to read. Emi speaks very naturally, and the parts where the source is intentionally written in a vague or deceptive way are nicely reflected in the translation.

Mentions:
Junko Makiyama (play), テンキョー (play), Mista (play)


Pole To Win Co., Ltd.

Pro: Yoriko Kuwahara (play)
The Japanese was “neutral” in a very good way. We appreciated how the translator did very well at making sure that the translation was not literal and obvious, and how he/she added extra line breaks, which made the text easier to read and gave a Japanese text adventure like feel to the game. We feel it is important to pay attention to how the translated text will look in the actual product, and this translator did admirably in this aspect.

Amateur: kunroku (play)
We liked the consistency and clarity of the translator’s Japanese. One could get a feel for Emi and Grandpa’s characters through the translation and the translator did a good job maintaining the atmosphere of the English version. Translating some of the player’s choices as if Grandpa was speaking that line was a nice touch as well.

Mentions:
Mamiko Ito (play), Junko Makiyama (play), Nozomi Oshima (play)

 

 

PORTUGUESE (Brazil)

Locsmiths

Pro: Luís Labres (play)
We found this translation very easy to read. It’s polished and deals nicely with the many challenging sentences in the test, especially those related to the “hinges” of the outdoor shack and the description of the odors, both in the office and in the kitchen.

The item translation options were smart, making them shorter but still catchy.

The overall text flows nicely from start to finish and we never felt it out of context or out of touch. Grammar and spelling were also dealt with competence.

In general, there were a few Pro applications with similar quality, but in the end, the smart choices and natural speech imprinted by this translator granted him the victory. Our only advice would be, in future, not to be afraid to further reinterpret the source, to be able to add more of the natural flavor a spectacularly dynamic language like portuguese has.

Congratulations.

Amateur: Jack Lake (play)
This is simply the best of all applications :)

In many aspects this translation is superior to any other applications, presenting a greater domain of vocabulary, that allowed the translator to superbly excel in the many challenging sentences in the test, especially those related to the “hinges” of the outdoor shack and the description of the odors, both in the office and in the kitchen.

The item translation options were fantastic, keeping the original sarcasm.

The overall text flows nicely from start to finish and we never felt it out of context or out of touch. The creativity marker always stood in high-gear, which turned the text into a very fun and rhythmed translation.

The downside was grammar and spelling. The work was not polished, containing several issues, but which we overlooked for the sake of the rest.

Of all applications, this one was the only that fully embodied the purpose of Locjam, so congratulations! Very well done!

Mentions:
Marcos Bolton (play), Gislene Kucker Arantes (play), Marina Vidal (play), Mercia Costa (play), Elaine Barros Moreira (play)


Synthesis

Pro: Luiz Fernando Alves (play)
We could find no grammar mistakes on the text. The translator used clear language and managed to provide a good flow to the text. The style successfully managed to convey the informal tone of the main character whilst also not sounding cliché.

Amateur: Bruno Rossi (play)
We found one instance of quotation marks that were not closed in the text, but apart from this mistake, this entry stands out as one of the most well-structured and detailed we’ve seen, as the translator managed to use a clear sentence structure and informal tone. The overall style suggests someone whose translation skills are very close to those of a professional translator.

Mentions:
Jack Lake (play)

 

 

RUSSIAN

All Correct

Pro: Elena Sherstneva (play)
Our goal was to choose one best professional translator and one non-professional. We had 51 variants all with unique and common mistakes. So, it was not an easy task. Selection process consisted of three phases: Rough, Fine, Very Fine. 22 translators were selected after the first step, only 8 of them left after the second, and the winners were revealed at last. Three in-house editors were involved and it took them about three weeks. The most common mistakes were: errors of meaning, grammatical and spelling errors, wrong style, punctuation issues, non-suitable capitalization, incorrect using of direct speech, untranslated fragments, wrong terms, noncompliance with target language conventions and many other.
Even those who passed all the strictest phases still had a few mistakes in translations. For example: “повидавших виды”, “тааакой”, “― Да она ведь почти как новенькая! ― Эми провела пальчиками по гладкой поверхности прибора, оставив бороздку в толстом слое пыли, покрывавшем его”.
We selected this translator for several reasons: no errors of meaning, grammatical and spelling errors and good writing style.

Amateur: Anastasiia Smirnova (play)
Our goal was to choose one best professional translator and one non-professional. We had 51 variants all with unique and common mistakes. So, it was not an easy task. Selection process consisted of three phases: Rough, Fine, Very Fine. 22 translators were selected after the first step, only 8 of them left after the second, and the winners were revealed at last. Three in-house editors were involved and it took them about three weeks. The most common mistakes were: errors of meaning, grammatical and spelling errors, wrong style, punctuation issues, non-suitable capitalization, incorrect using of direct speech, untranslated fragments, wrong terms, noncompliance with target language conventions and many other.
Even those who passed all the strictest phases still had a few mistakes in translations. For example: “Я отвезу тебя куда пожелаешь”, “Не хочу причинять тебе беспокойства”, “сердечное лекарство”.
We selected this translator for several reasons: no errors of meaning, grammatical and spelling errors and good writing style.

Mentions:
Aleksey Kondakov (play)


ITI Ltd

Pro: Natalya Chumak (play)
The translator demonstrated a good grasp on Russian language, the text has a natural sound to it, it is idiomatic and humorous, definitely not word-for-word translation, nothing sounded awkward or literal. The air of the story and the characters were represented very well.

Execution of translation is neat, the capitalisation is correct, are and, for the most part, the text is consistent with the visuals in the game. No typos found.

Amateur: Olga Melnikova (play)
The translation was easy to read and well structured. No literal translation. The air of the story and the characters are well-conveyed. The items were given good names, and correct rules of capitalization were used. No typos.

Mentions:
Anastasia Nikiforova (play), Yulia Solodukhina (play), Valentin Berlin (play)


Janus Worldwide

Pro: Alena Filatova (play)
The translation still has errors, but other “professional” translators are much worse. And we can’t say this translator is the winner in full meaning of this word. But their work is just than other pro-translators’.

Amateur: Aleksey Kondakov (play)
The translation is so good and original, that we had doubts about them not being a professional translator.

This translation was overall the best one, superb even to professional leaders.


Levsha

Pro: Natalya Chumak (play)
Translator latently avoided traps in the English text, style and choice of words are good and in the meantime, there is no overcreativity — Russian text says the same as the original does.

Amateur: Aleksey Kondakov (play)
Russian language in this translation is nice and easy to read; Emi’s speech is perfectly fluent and fits her character. Action labels are translated consistently, are understandable and easy to read. There are no visible technical problems.

Mentions:
Anastasia Nikiforova (play)

 

SPANISH (Europe)

PINK NOISE

Pro: Raquel Uzal (play)
At this level of translators, the choice is quite difficult and purely based on style preference from one candidate to another.
Hard choice, maybe even subjective, but this the one we preferred.

Amateur: Jordi Pejoan Quiroga (play)
At this level of translators, the choice is quite difficult and purely based on style preference from one candidate to another.
Hard choice, maybe even subjective, but this the one we preferred.


Synthesis Iberia

Pro: Raquel Uzal (play)
A couple of slight errors (regarding content, grammar and style) were detected; however the style was very pleasant and fluent. The translator used idiomatic expressions and made very good translation choices, far from literality. Good job!

Amateur: Jordi Pejoan Quiroga (play)
Some errors (regarding content, grammar and style) were detected; however the style was very pleasant and fluent. We spotted several extra line breaks that caused the text to have a weird format sometimes, but the overall quality was good. The translator used idiomatic expressions and made very good translation choices, far from literality. Good job!


Wordlab

Pro: Raquel Uzal (play)
We chose this entry because it was a daring one. The tone and style is really good and the translator took some interesting choices that added to the game experience. The text reads natural and fluently, and the punctuation is really good. An excellent translation.

Amateur: Clara Guillén Fernández (play)
For being an amateur entry, we found this translation rather good. There are some little mistakes here and there, but the overall quality is good. It is a shame that the IMG descriptions that are shown when you mouse over the items’ images is not translated. We can see some potential here.

Mentions:
Sergi Forner (play)

 

SPANISH (Latin America)

PINK NOISE

Pro: Erick Alejandro Solares García (play)
At this final stage of the contest, the choice is purely based on style preferences. This is the one we prefered among very good finalists that submitted very professional translations.

Amateur: Name withheld (play)
At this final stage of the contest, the choice is purely based on style preferences. This is the one we prefered among very good finalists that submitted very professional translations.


Synthesis

Pro: Natalia Gaspari (play)
We received many translations but we believe that this is the best. Leaving aside some minor issues, the style is very good and enjoyable and the spelling and grammar are excellent. It is obvious that the candidate loves his/her work. Congratulations!

Amateur: Paula Chiarino (play)
For an amateur entry it is pretty good. It has some issues but nevertheless, it surpassed more than one professional translator in both style and grammar. The translation is very clear and consistent. This amateur translator is very promising. Congratulations!

Mentions:
Gonzalo Delgado (play), Erick Alejandro Solares García (play), Virginia Casagrande (play)


Wordlab

Pro: Juan Guillermo Beiner (play)
The tone and style is really good. It reads fluently and natural. The images descriptions are translated, and the overall quality is very good. It was tough to declare a winner, since there were two entries we liked quite a lot, but we had to make a decision. Congratulations on your entry!

Amateur: Santiago Garay (play)
It was really tough choosing an amateur entry, since there were a few that were truly good, especially considering that they are not done by professionals. We chose this one because of the overall quality and tone, because the translator called Grandpa “abu”, which sounded very nice and familiar, and the images’ descriptions were translated, which was an added quality touch. Congratulations!

Mentions:
Walter Wekkesser (play)

 

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